Why South African art nowadays easily fetches millions around the world

(Click here to learn how to get hundreds of the very best, most important modern art books on Earth for FREE.)

On Tuesday, Giles Peppiatt and Hannah O’Leary of Bonhams, the international fine art auction house, gave a presentation at the Irma Stern Museum on the dramatic global rise in the value of South African art over the past decade.

Bonhams achieved a world record (R54-million) for the most expensive work of art by a South African artist ever to be sold (Irma Stern’s “Arab Priest”).

Peppiatt and O’Leary are credited with being the two people most responsible for creating an international market for South African art over the last decade.

They spoke for the first time about how this international market was created and analysed the huge investment value of contemporary South African and African art.

In the audio below Giles Peppiatt speaks about their presentation…

(Click here to learn how to get hundreds of the very best, most important modern art books on Earth for FREE.)


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